• Google Bookmarks
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Digg
  • reddit
Federal Government
Notorious Pedophile - Regarded As Sexually Dangerous - Committed To Federal Custody PDF Print E-mail
Federal Government
By Administrator   
Thursday, 18 October 2018 09:33
Chief United States District Judge Terrence W. Boyle committed Kelly Gerald Crosby, 35, to the custody of the Attorney General as a sexually dangerous person under the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006.
 
Crosby has a history of sexually molesting children and engaging in threatening behavior. Crosby admitted that he sexually molested 15 minors ages 2-13 years old. He also persuaded a 13-year-girl to email him nude photographs. During his incarceration for a probation violation related to that offense, Crosby wrote to the victim, threatening to rape her. In a separate letter to his sentencing judge, Crosby threatened to rape the judge’s wife as the judge watched and then kill the judge himself. He  also wrote to a female probation officer and threatened to rape her, too.
 
Crosby was prosecuted federally for those threatening letters and ultimately sentenced to additional imprisonment in a federal institution. In March 2018, and while he  was serving that federal sentence, the United States certified him as a sexually dangerous person under the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006. Congress passed that Act in 2006 to provide another powerful legal mechanism for protecting the public from some of the most dangerous sexual offenders. The Act allows the United States to seek civil commitment of sexually dangerous persons who, because of a serious mental illness, abmnormality, or disorder, would have serious difficulty refraining from sexually violent conduct or child molestation.
 
Crosby admitted to his sexual misconduct and sexually violent threats in writing during his civil commitment proceeding. Reviewing those facts and other aspects of this case, four independent psychologists – including his own selected examiner – agreed that he met the criteria for civil commitment as a sexually dangerous person. Crosby's stipulated facts and the experts’ reports were provided to Chief Judge Boyle who, on October 16, 2018, committed CROSBY to the custody of the Attorney General
.
“Kelly Crosby’s record of child molestation and sexually violent threats is undeniably heinous,” said U.S. Attorney Higdon. “He is a dangerous predator who exemplifies the need for the Adam Walsh Act. This Office will continue to vigorously pursue civil commitment of sexually dangerous persons like Crosby. Our communities, our families, and our children deserve nothing less.”
 
The United States Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of North Carolina litigates all Adam Walsh Act cases for the entire country. All sexually dangerous persons who are committed to federal custody are housed in a federal facility in that district, where intensive, residential treatment is offered to them. Crosby  is the eighty-first sexually dangerous person committed under the Adam Walsh Act. 
 
Assistant United States Attorneys Michael Gordon James and Dennis Duffy represented the government in this case.
Last Updated on Thursday, 18 October 2018 09:38
 
Wilmington Drug Dealer Gets 10 Year Federal Sentence PDF Print E-mail
Federal Government
By Administrator   
Thursday, 18 October 2018 09:11
 Judge Terrence W. Boyle sentenced William Pollock31, of Wilmington, North Carolina to 120 months of imprisonment followed by 3 years of supervised release.
 
On June 26, 2018, Pollock entered a plea of guilty to Possession with Intent to Distribute 28 Grams or More of Cocaine Base (Crack) and 500 Grams or More of Cocaine.
 
On January 18, 2018, the New Hanover County Sheriff’s Office (NHCSO) Narcotics Detectives conducted a traffic stop of a car leaving a drug stash house in which Pollock was a passenger. Law enforcement discovered items in the car that led to a search warrant of Pollock's residence. NHCSO officers found more than 350 grams of cocaine and 50 grams of crack cocaine in the residence.
 
During the course of the investigation it was discovered that Pollock had been purchasing cocaine since July 2017. This included
the several ounces of cocaine purchased just two days prior to his arrest.
 
Pollock's self-described philosophy is summed by a tattoo on his body which reads, “Port City Menace” said investigators.
 
This case is part of the Take Back North Carolina Initiative of the United States Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of North Carolina. This initiative emphasizes the regional assignment of federal prosecutors to work with law enforcement and District Attorney’s Offices on a sustained basis in those communities to reduce the violent crime rate, drug trafficking, and crimes against law enforcement.
 
This investigation was conducted by the New Hanover County Sheriff’s Vice Unit and the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s Costal Career Criminal Enterprise Unit. Assistant United States Attorney Timothy M. Severo handled the prosecution of this case for the government.
Last Updated on Thursday, 18 October 2018 09:14
 
Wilmington Gang Members Sentenced To Federal Prison For Drug Crimes PDF Print E-mail
Federal Government
By Administrator   
Thursday, 18 October 2018 09:01
United States District Judge James C. Dever III sentenced Deandre Sweet, 27, of Wilmington to 105 months of imprisonment followed by 3 years of supervised release. Additionally, yesterday, Kyric Sweet, 25, of Wilmington was sentenced to 90 months of imprisonment followed by 3 years of supervised release.
 
On September 19, 2016, in a joint investigation, the FBI Safe Streets Task Force Gang Unit and the New Hanover County Sheriff’s Office Vice Division arranged an undercover purchase of heroin from D. Sweet. When he arrived at a parking lot in Wilmington to complete the sale, law enforcement stopped his rental car and found 500 bags of heroin during a search of the vehicle. D. Sweet was then arrested.
 
According to the investigation, D. Sweet imported more than 500 grams of heroin from New York and New Jersey fordistribution. A portion of this heroin was provided to gang members in the Wilmington area.
 
In the same joint investigation, law enforcement conducted several undercover purchases from K. Sweet between June and October 2017. On October 12, 2017, law enforcement arrested him in possession of a quantity of heroin and more than $2,500. K Sweet is a validated gang member.
 
These cases are part of the Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Force Investigation entitled Tooth Fairy targeting gangs and heroin distribution in southeast North Carolina. This investigation was conducted by the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s Safe Streets Task Force, Wilmington Police Department Gang Unit and the New Hanover County Sheriff’s Office. Assistant United States Attorney Timothy M. Severo handled the prosecution of this case for the government.
Last Updated on Thursday, 18 October 2018 09:06
 
North Carolina Wins $27 Million In Federal Grants To Fight Opioid Abuse PDF Print E-mail
Federal Government
By Administrator   
Tuesday, 16 October 2018 14:24

North Carolina will receive $27 million over the next year to fight the state’s opioid epidemic by getting people off opioids and preventing others from misusing them. Grants include $23 million from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), and $4 million from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services will administer both grants.

“Preventing opioid misuse and treating addiction save lives and we must fight harder against substance use disorder,” Governor Roy Cooper said. “These grants will help prevent overdose deaths, provide resources to families, and provide effective treatment for those struggling with opioids.”

“Securing these grants is an important step in fighting the opioid epidemic, but this is only one part of the solution,” said DHHS Secretary Mandy Cohen, M.D. “An opioid use disorder is a chronic disease and we need to make sure there is sustainable funding for people to have ongoing, affordable access to care.”

The $23 million in SAMHSA funds are part of the agency’s State Opioid Response Grants, which focus on treatment and reducing opioid overdose-related deaths through prevention. A previous SAMHSA grant allowed more than 5,700 people to get care previously not available to them. North Carolina has 70 opioid treatment programs that provide medication-assisted treatment to 20,000 people each day.

The State Opioid Response grant will also include a pilot program to work with families whose children are at risk of out-of-home placement due to parental substance use, and an initiative with the North Carolina Department of Public Safety to help individuals re-entering communities from jail or prison to begin medication-assisted treatment. Funds will also be provided to the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians to augment medication-assisted treatment and trauma-informed care, increase community awareness and implement a rapid response team to assist individuals in accessing care.

The $4 million, one-year grant awarded by the CDC will strengthen statewide monitoring of the opioid epidemic and local responses to it. Approximately $2 million of these funds will go to local health departments in counties facing the highest burden of opioid deaths to support community overdose prevention strategies. The CDC grant will also support training for first responders and medical students, as well as education campaigns and technical assistance for local partners.

The federal Health Resources and Services Administration has also awarded Rural Communities Opioid Response funding for rural communities to develop plans for prevention, treatment and recovery interventions to reduce opioid overdoses. Communities applied as part of consortiums of organizations, and four consortiums in North Carolina were awarded grants of $200,000 each. Recipients are Appalachian Mountain Community Health Centers and Western North Carolina AIDs Project, Inc., both based in Buncombe County; Coastlands Ministries based in Wilkes County; and Metropolitan Community Health based in Beaufort County.

In 2017, an estimated 1,683 deaths in North Carolina were attributed to unintentional opioid overdoses. The number of unintentional overdose deaths involving opioids, including prescription opioids and illicit opioids such as heroin and fentanyl in 2017, was more than 10 times higher than in 1999.

Many of the strategies that will be implemented using these funds are part of the NC Opioid Action Plan, which lays out key strategies to reduce the burden of opioid overdose deaths.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 16 October 2018 14:26
 
«StartPrev12345678NextEnd»

Page 1 of 8
Copyright 2011 - All Rights Reserved
3012 Highwoods Blvd., Suite 200
Raleigh, NC 27604
Telephone: (919) 790-9392