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Local Government
Forsyth County Gets Royalties For New Tax Appraisal Software PDF Print E-mail
Local Government
By Administrator   
Monday, 11 November 2019 09:31

Forsyth County Government will receive a total  of $122,169 for a property tax appraisal program it developed that‘s being used by counties across the state. 

The royalties come the North Carolina Property Tax System (NCPTS) software offered to counties by the NC Association of County Commissioners. In 2012, Forsyth County transferred a CAMA (Computer-Assisted Mass Appraisal) program it created to the NCPTS. As part of the agreement, Forsyth was to receive 10 percent of CAMA implementation fees for the system over the next seven years.

NCPTS is being used in counties across the state, including in Forsyth, Mecklenburg and Guilford. It supports 51 percent of the statewide property tax base. 

The system is managed by Farragut Systems, Inc., a Durham-based software company. Farragut’s co-founders CEO Shail Jain and CCO Sucheta Jain presented Forsyth County commissioners with its first royalty check of $82,596 during a county briefing on Nov. 7. More royalties will come to Forsyth as other counties that use the system make payments over time, totaling $122,169 all together.

Some of the many county staff with Management Information Systems (MIS) and the Tax Department who worked together to develop the system were recognized during the briefing.

“It’s a reflection of the intellectual capacity of the county when you create own program,” said County Manager Dudley Watts. “The depth of your knowledge has to be remarkable.”

Shail Jain said that Forsyth’s appraisal system has been a model for other counties and he’s  even had a county in Louisiana express interest in using NCPTS.

 
Forsyth County Gets Royalties For New Tax Appraisal Software PDF Print E-mail
Local Government
By Administrator   
Monday, 11 November 2019 09:31

Forsyth County Government will receive a total  of $122,169 for a property tax appraisal program it developed that‘s being used by counties across the state. 

The royalties come the North Carolina Property Tax System (NCPTS) software offered to counties by the NC Association of County Commissioners. In 2012, Forsyth County transferred a CAMA (Computer-Assisted Mass Appraisal) program it created to the NCPTS. As part of the agreement, Forsyth was to receive 10 percent of CAMA implementation fees for the system over the next seven years.

NCPTS is being used in counties across the state, including in Forsyth, Mecklenburg and Guilford. It supports 51 percent of the statewide property tax base. 

The system is managed by Farragut Systems, Inc., a Durham-based software company. Farragut’s co-founders CEO Shail Jain and CCO Sucheta Jain presented Forsyth County commissioners with its first royalty check of $82,596 during a county briefing on Nov. 7. More royalties will come to Forsyth as other counties that use the system make payments over time, totaling $122,169 all together.

Some of the many county staff with Management Information Systems (MIS) and the Tax Department who worked together to develop the system were recognized during the briefing.

“It’s a reflection of the intellectual capacity of the county when you create own program,” said County Manager Dudley Watts. “The depth of your knowledge has to be remarkable.”

Shail Jain said that Forsyth’s appraisal system has been a model for other counties and he’s  even had a county in Louisiana express interest in using NCPTS.

 
ICE Releases List of Illegal Aliens Currently In Custody In Mecklenburg County Charged With Violent Crimes PDF Print E-mail
Local Government
By Administrator   
Friday, 25 October 2019 10:35
 State lawmakers demanded Friday that the Mecklenburg County Sheriff honor detainer requests from the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) following information released by the agency detailing violent criminal charges against illegal immigrants currently in custody who could be released into North Carolina communities.  
 
Murder, assault, robbery, and sex offenses committed against minors are among the serious charges against foreign nationals currently in custody at the Mecklenburg County Detention Center with outstanding detainer requests from DHS’s U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agency. 
 
The outstanding detainers were only issued for illegal immigrants “handcuffed and arrested for a crime committed in the local community” according to information released by ICE on Friday.  
 
Sanctuary policies implemented by the Mecklenburg County Sheriff this year protect those individuals from federal law enforcement’s detainer requests despite the being charged crimes in North Carolina.
 
“These are just the latest examples of unlawfully present aliens charged with serious public safety offenses in Mecklenburg County – yet these latest examples are still currently in local custody,” the agency said Friday.  “These cases have all been identified by ICE to be illegal aliens subject to an Ice detainer and yet, per current local policy, they would be released back into the local community without notice to ICE.” 
 
Lawmakers in North Carolina approved legislation supported as a “high priority” by the state Sheriffs’ Association compelling the Mecklenburg County Sheriff to comply with ICE detainers for individuals currently in custody and charged with crimes, but the bill was vetoed by Gov. Roy Cooper and opposed by legislative Democrats. 
 
H.B. 370 Require Cooperation with ICE Detainers provides “an appropriate and careful balance under the Constitution for the rights of the accused and for the public safety of our communities,” according to the North Carolina Sheriffs’ Association.  
 
The measure was nonetheless vetoed by the Governor, allowing the Mecklenburg County Sheriff to refuse detainer requests and release suspected illegal immigrants with significant criminal histories – who are currently in custody charged with criminal offenses and wanted by federal officials – back into North Carolina communities.
 
State House sponsors of H.B. 370 and Speaker Tim Moore (R-Cleveland) released a joint statement Friday demanding the Mecklenburg County Sheriff honor detainer requests for individuals identified by ICE as currently in custody and charged with crimes. 
 
“The sanctuary law enforcement policies of the Mecklenburg County Sheriff and Governor Cooper put North Carolinians’ safety at risk every single day,” said state Reps. Carson Smith (R-Pender), Destin Hall (R-Caldwell), Brenden Jones (R-Columbus), Jason Saine (R-Lincoln), and Speaker Moore. 
 
“The Governor’s support for an open-borders policy of non-cooperation with immigration officials presents an unconscionable and unnecessary threat to the people of this state every day.  To protect illegal aliens charged with crimes over the safety of North Carolina communities is not only a dereliction of duty, it is a deliberate decision to put the people of North Carolina in harm’s way.”      
                      
“We demand the Mecklenburg County Sheriff comply with immigration detainers for illegal aliens charged with murder, assault, robbery, sex offenses against minors, and other violent offenses.  The Governor must also release legislative Democrats to override his veto of H.B. 370 and put an immediate stop to this imminent threat to public safety in North Carolina.”   
 
Rep. Smith was the sheriff of Pender County for 16 years.  Rep. Hall is an attorney and chairman of the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Criminal Matters.  Rep. Saine is a senior co-chair of the House Appropriations Committee and Rep. Jones is the Deputy House Majority Leader. 
 
According to ICE, in 2018 more than 470 criminal aliens were transferred into ICE custody pursuant to an immigration detainer from Charlotte, N.C.
 
Since the enactment of Mecklenburg’s non-cooperation policy, those individuals are instead released into North Carolina communities where they are free to reoffend until ICE is able to locate and arrest them, or until they commit additional preventable crimes resulting in their arrest again by law enforcement.
 
“As these persons remain in local custody, should Mecklenburg County reconsider its non-cooperation policy, there is still time to prevent the release of these individuals and instead work cooperatively to protect public safety,” ICE said in its release Friday. 
 
Last Updated on Friday, 25 October 2019 10:37
 
Eno River Association Names New Executive Director PDF Print E-mail
Local Government
By Administrator   
Friday, 18 October 2019 10:41
Jessica L. Sheffield will join The Eno River Association (ERA) as Executive Director on October 28, 2019.  Sheffield succeeds Robin Jacobs who will retire after 14 years in the ERA’s top staff leadership role and six years on the organization’s board of directors. The search was guided by moss+ross, a Triangle-based consulting and executive search firm with expertise in nonprofit management.
 
"As the Eno River Association begins its 55th year in operation as a community-focused environmental land trust, we are thrilled to announce the appointment of Jessica Sheffield as our new executive director,” said Alanna Howard, president of the ERA board. “Her experience in the non-profit sector and in building relationships will be assets to the ERA. Jessica has committed her career to environmental education and demonstrates a personal passion for leading Eno's next chapter. I encourage all members of the ERA and the larger Eno community to join us in welcoming Jessica."
Jacobs noted, “In an area that continues to see unprecedented development, it gives me great satisfaction to know that our wild river and its protected lands will remain a constant. I welcome Jessica with absolute confidence that she shares a love of these lands and waters and is prepared to continue the Eno River Association’s commitment to protecting the Eno basin for generations to come.”
 
Sheffield holds a Master of Science degree in Environmental Education & Parks and Recreation from Slippery Rock University in Pennsylvania and has 16 years of experience in environmental policy administration and program management. She comes to ERA from Duke University’s
Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions, where she served as Program Coordinator. Before joining the Nicholas Institute, Sheffield was Executive Director of Schoolhouse of Wonder, where she led a 10-person team in providing hands-on science and history programs to 3,500 Durham schoolchildren each year. She also served a four-year term on the Board of Directors for Friends of West Point City Park.
 
“The Eno River has had my heart since I moved to Durham in the summer of 2000. I am deeply honored by this invitation to join the staff, volunteers, members, and Board of the Eno River Association to further their impressive work in the areas of conservation, advocacy, and education. There is no greater, nor more important time in our environmental and political history to be working at the community level. I’m eager to pledge my efforts to the Association’s mission, right here, in our local watershed,” Sheffield said.
 
Since its founding in 1966 by Durham community activist Margaret Nygard, the Eno River Association has followed a mission to conserve and protect the natural, cultural and historic resources of the Eno River basin. Leadership by the ERA helped to create the Eno River State Park in 1973. Since then, through additional fundraising and land acquisition, ERA has helped Eno River State Park grow to well over 4,000 acres and has helped protect more than 7,000 acres within the Eno River basin that include West Point on the Eno City Park, Penny’s Bend, Little River Regional Park, and the Occoneechee Mountain State Natural Area, all of which are enjoyed by over 700 thousand people annually. Together, these lands benefit water quality protection, biological diversity, wildlife habitat, recreational and educational opportunities, scenic views, and productive working farms and forests.
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