Local Government
Union County Invites Public Comment On Comprehensive Plan PDF Print E-mail
Local Government
By Administrator   
Wednesday, 25 November 2020 10:28

MONROE, N.C. (November 25, 2020)– Union County has opened a four-week public comment period on the draft report of the comprehensive plan. The plan, called Union County 2050, will provide guidance to County leadership and staff on addressing growth, public health, safety, environment, infrastructure, and economic development through 2050.

 

“This is an exciting milestone in this project and we hope to hear from as many Union County residents as possible,” said Lee Jenson, Planning Director. “Union County 2050 has been led by our resident’s voices since the start of this process and it’s vital we continue to get valuable input.”

 

Residents, stakeholders, and business leaders are invited to learn about the draft comprehensive plan and provide comments through Dec. 18 online, as well as during virtual and in-person meetings. The format and information provided will be the same at all meetings. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, face coverings will be required. Physical distancing will be encouraged and sanitizing stations will be available.

  • Dec. 8, 2020 from 5:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. at the Union County Agricultural Center, 3230-D Presson Road, Monroe, NC 28112
  • Dec. 14, 2020 from 11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. at Indian Trail Town Hall, 315 Matthews-Indian Trail Road, Indian Trail, NC 28079
  • Dec. 15, 2020 from 5:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. at the Waxhaw Police Dept. Community Room, 3620 Providence Road, Waxhaw, NC 28173

The current schedule is to present the final plan and recommendations to the Board of Commissioners in early 2021.

To learn more about the process, visit the Union County 2050 web page.

                                            

 
Chatham County Appoints Health Director PDF Print E-mail
Local Government
By Administrator   
Tuesday, 24 November 2020 13:58

The Chatham County Board of Health voted unanimously to appoint Mike Zelek as the next Health Director.


Zelek has worked with the Chatham County Public Health Department for eight years, first as Social Research Associate and later as Health Promotion & Policy Division Director. He has served as the Interim Health Director since June 1st following the retirement of the previous health director, Layton Long. 


Mike has done an outstanding job over the last several months, and the Board is thrilled Mike has accepted this role,” said Chatham County Board of Health Chair Carol Reitz-Barlow. “Mike is committed to health equity and moving forward with a diverse and equitable Health Department that recognizes the needs of Chatham County.”

 
Zelek has worked with the Chatham County Public Health Department for eight years, first as Social Research Associate and later as Health Promotion & Policy Division Director. He has served as the Interim Health Director since June 1st following the retirement of the previous health director, Layton Long. 
 
“Mike has done an outstanding job over the last several months, and the Board is thrilled Mike has accepted this role,” said Chatham County Board of Health Chair Carol Reitz-Barlow. “Mike is committed to health equity and moving forward with a diverse and equitable Health Department that recognizes the needs of Chatham County.”
 
Zelek holds a Masters of Public Health from UNC-Chapel Hill and Bachelor of Arts from Northwestern University. During his time with CCPHD, he has served on the Boards of Directors of several Chatham County and North Carolina non-profit organizations. He is currently the President of the North Carolina Public Health Association.
 
“I am honored to serve as Chatham County’s Health Director, and am grateful to the Board of Health for its support,” said Zelek. “I consider myself very fortunate to work with such a highly dedicated and skilled team in a community that values the important role of public health.”
 
Since taking over in the interim role, Zelek has overseen the department’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic and has worked to advance other public health initiatives, including health equity, while also adapting to the recent cyber incident.
 
“I am inspired by our team’s perseverance as it responds to an ongoing pandemic while continuing to provide critical services to the Chatham community,” added Zelek. “While we all wish the virus would go away, the reality is that it is an increasingly serious threat to our community and we all must remain vigilant in our response, just as this team has been throughout the pandemic.” 
 
State Implements County COVID Warning System PDF Print E-mail
Local Government
By Administrator   
Tuesday, 24 November 2020 10:13
Governor Roy Cooper announced a new COVID-19 County Alert System to pinpoint counties with the highest levels of viral spread and offer specific recommendations to bring numbers down. This system will help give local leaders another tool to understand how their county is faring and to make decisions about actions to slow viral spread. The map will be updated every four weeks. 
 
“By pinpointing counties with high virus transmission and asking everyone in those counties to work with us and do more right now to slow the spread of the virus, we can succeed,” Governor Cooper said. “It can help bring down their case rates, keep their communities safer, save lives and keep their hospital systems working.”
 
“It’s going to take all of us working together to avoid tightening restrictions like so many states are now doing,” said NCDHHS Secretary Mandy K. Cohen. “The COVID-19 County Alert System gives North Carolinians an easy way to see how their county is doing and know what they can do protect their family and neighbors and slow the spread of this virus.”
 
The system uses metrics informed by the White House Coronavirus Task Force and North Carolina’s key metrics to categorize counties into three tiers:
 
Yellow: Significant Community Spread
 
Orange: Substantial Community Spread
 
Red: Critical Community Spread
 
Because no one metric provides a complete picture, the COVID-19 County Alert System uses a combination of three metrics: case rate, the percent of tests that are positive, and hospital impact within the county. 
 
To be assigned to the red or orange tier, a county must meet the threshold for case rate for that tier AND the threshold for either percent positive OR hospital impact. 
 
Case Rate: The number of new cases in 14 days per 100,000 people

 

Percent Positive: The percent of tests that are positive over 14 days 

 

Hospital Impact: A composite score based on the impact that COVID-19 has had on hospitals including percent of COVID-19 hospitalizations, COVID-19 related visits to the Emergency Department, staffed open hospital beds, and critical staffing shortages over 14 days
 
 
 
State Offers $10,000 Award For Murder Of Edenton Child PDF Print E-mail
Local Government
By Administrator   
Tuesday, 24 November 2020 10:08
The State of North Carolina is offering a reward of up to $10,000 for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person or persons responsible for the death of Makiia Slade, age 9, and the critical wounding of her mother, Shatory Hunter Slade, age 30.
 
On July 24, 2020, Ms. Hunter Slade was driving home on Highway 17 near the intersection of West Queen Street in Edenton, North Carolina. At approximately 10:15 p.m. it is believed more than one person shot at her vehicle as she was taking the exit toward home. The bullets entered her car, critically injuring her and killing Makiia Slade.   
 
Anyone with information about this case should contact the Chowan County Sheriff’s Office at (252) 482-8484 or the State Bureau of Investigation at (919) 662-4500.
Last Updated on Tuesday, 24 November 2020 10:09
 
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