State Government
Governor Announces Appointments PDF Print E-mail
State Government
By Administrator   
Friday, 18 September 2020 17:16
Gov. Cooper has appointed the following individual to the Arboretum Board of Directors: 
 
Dr. Darin J. Waters of Asheville as a member at-large. Waters is an Assistant Professor of History and Special Assistant to the Chancellor for Community Outreach and Engagement at the University of North Carolina at Asheville. Waters has organized three major conferences surrounding the history of African Americans in Western North Carolina and Southern Appalachia. 

 

Gov. Cooper has appointed the following individual to the North Carolina Commission for the Blind: 
 
Denise Lyons Puryear of Roxboro as a community rehab program service provider representative. Puryear works for OE Enterprises, Inc. as a site director, community service manager, placement services manager, team coordinator, and an occupational training specialist. Puryear has over 30 years of experience in the fields of intellectual and developmental disabilities, mental health, and substance service. 
Gov. Cooper has appointed the following individuals to the Governor’s Crime Commission: 
 
Sherri Allgood of Troy as a municipal government official. Allgood became the first African American mayor of Troy, NC in 2018. Allgood is a retired middle school teacher and now focuses her time as a student advocate meeting with school districts, teachers, and parents to work towards equal education and treatment for all students in school. She co-founded True Worship Ministries in Biscoe with her husband. 

 

John W. Letteney of Apex as a municipal government official. Letteney was appointed Chief of Police for the Apex Police Department in 2012. Letteney is the 3rd Vice President of the International Association of Chiefs of Police. In 2020, Letteny was appointed to the Respect for Law Enforcement and the Rule of Law Working Group of the President’s Commission on Law Enforcement and the Administration of Justice. 

 

Sheriff Charles Blackwood of Chapel Hill vice chair. Blackwood is the Sheriff of the Orange County Sheriff’s Office. Blackwood rose through the ranks of the Orange County Sheriff’s Office being promoted to Corporal, Sergeant and then Lieutenant of the Patrol Division before he was promoted to Major of Operations in 2010.  

 

Gov. Cooper has appointed the following individuals to the Council on Developmental Disabilities: 
 
William T. Miller of Lexington as a person with a developmental disability. Miller is a lawyer who focuses on estate planning, social security, and disability insurance. Miller previously served as the Executive Director of the North Carolina Statewide Independent Living Council in Raleigh. 
Ronnie D. Marshall of Raleigh as a person with a developmental disability. Marshall is a community self-advocate, serving on multiple boards and committees such as the North Carolina Empowerment Network and Arts Access Incorporated. 

 

Nessie P. Siler of Manteo as a person with a developmental disability. Siler is a member of the Dare County North Carolina Transportation Board. She previously served with the North Carolina Medicaid Long Term Services and Supports Stakeholder Engagement Group and the North Carolina Emergency Preparedness Initiative for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

 

Bryan Dooley of Lewisville as a person with a developmental disability or parent/guardian of child with a developmental disability or immediate relative/guardian of adult with mentally impairing developmental disability. Dooley is a member of the North Carolina Empowerment Network and past chair. He is also the Chair of the Board of Directors for Disability Rights and the social media cultivator of the Liipfert Law Group. 

 

Gov. Cooper has appointed the following individual to the North Carolina Council on Educational Services for Exceptional Children:
 
Matthew M. Potter of Pfafftown as an individual with a disability. Potter is a consultant for the Horizons Residential Care Workforce Development Grant, Community Bridges Consulting Group, and the Wake Forest University Athletic Department. Potter is also a member of the CenterPoint Human Services I/DD Advisory Committee and the CenterPoint Human Services Board of Directors. 

 

Gov. Cooper has appointed the following individual to the Fayetteville Technical Community College Board of Trustees: 
 
William “Lockett” Tally of Fayetteville as a member at-large. Tally is a managing partner at Tally and Tally, Attorneys and Counselors at Law PLLC. Tally is a member of the North Carolina Academy of Trial Lawyers and the Methodist University Board of Visitors. 
Gov. Cooper has appointed the following individual to the Haywood Community College Board of Trustees: 
 
Tammy H. McDowell of Canton as a member at-large. McDowell is the assistant director of programing at Lake Junaluska Conference and Retreat Center. McDowell has also been the chair of the Haywood MLK Committee for more than ten years. 
Gov. Cooper has appointed the following individual to the North Carolina Home Inspector Licensure Board: 
 
Derrick M. Johnson of Charlotte as a home inspector. Johnson is a building and residential consultant and inspector with Pride Property Inspections. Johnson is a member of the Charlotte Mecklenburg Housing Partnership and the Charlotte Apartment Association. 
Gov. Cooper has appointed the following individual to the Lenoir Community College Board of Trustees:
 
Nicholas E. Harvey, Sr. of Kinston as a member at-large. Harvey has practiced criminal and traffic law at his private law practice in Kinston for more than 30 years.

 

Gov. Cooper has appointed the following individual to the North Carolina State Lottery Commission: 
 
Brad T. Adcock of Cary as chair. Adcock retired in 2014 as the Vice President, Government Affairs for Blue Cross and Blue Shield of NC. He came out of retirement as served as the Legislative Director for the Governor’s Office from 2017-2018. Adcock served on the UNC Board of Governors for 12 years and the Appalachian State University Board of Trustees. 
Gov. Cooper has appointed the following individual to the North Carolina Medical Care Commission:
 
Dr. Anita L. Jackson of Raleigh as a member at-large. Jackson currently serves as the Medical and Laboratory Director of Durham County Department of Public Health. She also serves as the Commissioner of North Carolina Health and Wellness Trust Fund. In 2018 Jackson was named Woman of Year by the Raleigh Chapter of Zeta Phi Beta Sorority Incorporated. 

 

Gov. Cooper has appointed the following individuals to the North Carolina Museum of Art Board of Trustees: 
 
Tim Gold of Conover as a 10th congressional district representative. Gold is the founder of the National LGBT Museum. Gold formerly worked as project manager for the Smithsonian’s National Postal Museum. He and his husband, Mitchell, own and operate Tim Gold Dog Training. 
Jacquie Gilliam of Greensboro as a 13th congressional district representative. Gilliam has worked as a philanthropy consultant for over 25 years. She serves as co-chair of the City of Greensboro Task Force on arts and sustainability. She also serves on the NC Aquarium Society, ArtsGreensboro, Weatherspoon Arts Foundation and United Way of Greater Greensboro. 

 

Gov. Cooper has appointed the following individual to the Pamlico Community College Board of Trustees:
 
Vickie Moseley Jones of Oriental as a member at-large. Jones retired in 2016 after 28 years as the executive director of human resources and chief diversity officer for Craven Community College. Jones has been a poll worker for the Pamlico County Board of Elections for 10 years.
Gov. Cooper has appointed the following individual to the Permanency Innovation Initiative Oversight Committee: 
 
Andrea R. Smith of West End as a representative from Youth Villages. Smith is the State Director of Community Based Programs at Youth Villages. Smith is a member of the National Board of Licensed Professional Counselors and the National Board of Certified Counselors, Inc.
 
Gov. Cooper has appointed the following individual to the Sampson Community College Board of Trustees: 
 
Vivian Maynor of Clinton as a member at-large. Maynor is a retired teacher, principal, and curriculum specialist. Maynor is a current member of the North Carolina Indian Housing Authority and secretary of the Free Will Holiness Conference. 

 

Gov. Cooper has appointed the following individual to the North Carolina Sedimentation Control Commission: 
 
Emily Sutton of Bynum as a non-governmental conservationist. Sutton is the Haw Riverkeeper for the Haw River Assembly. Sutton conducts research on the sediment control issues in the Haw watershed. Prior to her role as riverkeeper, Sutton was the Citizen Science Project Coordinator for the Haw River Assembly.

 

Gov. Cooper has appointed the following individual to the North Carolina Board of Science, Technology, and Innovation: 
 
Margaret N. Rosenfeld of Raleigh as a member at-large. Rosenfeld is a partner at K&L Gates where she has worked in corporate and security law, both within the United State and internationally, for more than twenty years. Rosenfeld has served in a voluntary capacity as the Honorary German Consul for Eastern North Carolina where she represents the interest of German companies in North Carolina and North Carolina companies in Germany. 
Gov. Cooper has appointed the following individuals to the Statewide Independent Living Council: 
 
Jennifer M. Pleasants of Raleigh as a Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Representative. Pleasants is an Independent Living Program Specialist for the North Carolina Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services. 

 

Talley Wells of Raleigh as a Council on Developmental Disabilities Representative. Wells is the Executive Director of the North Carolina Council on Developmental Disabilities. Wells was most recently the Executive Director for the Georgia Appleseed Center for Law and Justice in Atlanta, Georgia.

 

Gov. Cooper has appointed the following individual to the State Education Assistance Authority:
 
Jamie A. Applequist of Garner as a member with expertise in finance. Applequist is the Chief Administrative Officer for the State Employees Credit Union where he works with the branch network, contact centers and property management. Applequist served in the United States Air Force Reserves for twenty years, retiring in 2012. 
Gov. Cooper has appointed the following individuals to the Social Work Certification and Licensure Board: 
 
Ebon Freeman-James of Fayetteville as a LCSW. Freeman-James is a retired clinical social worker for Capital Caring. Freeman-James currently volunteers with the Girl Scouts, the United States Air Force Reserve, the UNC Chapel Hill School of Social Work Board of Advisors, and the Camp Corral Board of Directors. 
Carolyn G. Craddock of Wilmington as a LCSW and educator. Craddock is a lecturer and assistant field coordinator at the University of North Carolina in Wilmington. Craddock serves as the President of the National Association of Social Workers in North Carolina. 

 

Gov. Cooper has appointed the following individual to the North Carolina Travel and Tourism Board: 
 
Steven R. Pasquantonio of Surf City as a public member. Pasquantonio is the owner of Daddy Mac’s Beach Grille on Topsail Island and is a member of Green Ke Kai Properties. Pasquantonio is also a member of the Town of Surf City Planning Board. 
Gov. Cooper has appointed the following individual to the North Carolina Veterinary Medical Board: 
 
Dr. Allen L. Cannedy of Hillsborough as a Licensed Veterinarian. Cannedy is the Director of Diversity and Multicultural Affairs at North Carolina State University College of Veterinary Medicine. Cannedy has been awarded numerous honors including the Iverson Bell Award, the UPCEA South Continuing Education Faculty Award, and the North Carolina State University Chancellors Creating Community Award. 
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Cooper Asks President To Ban Off-Shore Drilling In NC For 10 Years PDF Print E-mail
State Government
By Administrator   
Friday, 18 September 2020 17:14
Governor Roy Cooper wrote to urge President Donald Trump and his administration to include North Carolina in the recently announced moratorium on oil drilling for the next ten years. Last week, the President extended the moratorium in South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, but omitted North Carolina’s Atlantic coast. 
 
“I am deeply concerned and disappointed that you did not include North Carolina in the moratorium,” wrote Governor Cooper. “Offshore drilling threatens North Carolina’s coastal economy and environment and offers our state minimal economic benefit. Accepted science tells us that there is little, if any, oil worth drilling for off North Carolina’s coast, and the risks of offshore drilling far outweigh the benefits.”  
 
Governor Cooper has consistently called on the Trump administration to protect North Carolina’s coast from the dangers of offshore oil exploration and drilling, which would threaten coastal communities by jeopardizing tourism, commercial and recreational fishing and the natural resources that fuel the coastal economy, generating over $3 billion annually and supporting over 30,000 jobs. 
 
Forty-five North Carolina communities have adopted formal resolutions opposing the expansion of drilling.  
 
Republicans Blast Governor Cooper's Opposition To Opportunity Scholarship PDF Print E-mail
State Government
By Administrator   
Friday, 18 September 2020 17:09
Governor Roy Cooper, during an event put together by the liberal Public School Forum, said the Opportunity Scholarship program designed to help low- and middle-income families send their children to schools that better fit their individual needs is "wrong" and "needs to stop." 
 
The Opportunity Scholarship program was created in 2013 by the General Assembly, and provides families with up to $4,200 to attend a private school of their choice. In September, the General Assembly changed the income eligibility threshold to 150% of the amount required for a student to qualify for free or reduced lunch. That means a family of four making $72,000 now qualifies for the Opportunity Scholarship. 
 
"School vouchers are wrong. They hurt public schools. They hurt students," Gov. Cooper said. "It is a wrong use of tax dollars and it needs to stop." 
 
A Civitas Institute Poll from January 2020 found that the Opportunity Scholarship had broad support among Republicans, Democrats, and unaffiliated voters. 
 
Sen. Deanna Ballard (R-Watauga) said, "Gov. Cooper is just plain wrong about Opportunity Scholarships and school choice. When I hear from Opportunity Scholarship families, I listen to stories of children succeeding beyond their parents' expectations. I listen to their stories of growth and opportunity. The future of our students is not an expense, but a wise investment that empowers families and benefits the health and landscape of our state." 
 
Sen. Jim Perry (R-Lenoir) said, "How can giving disadvantaged students a chance to access schools previously reserved for the wealthy and elite be considered 'wrong' and hurtful? Gov. Cooper's logic just doesn't add up. A student's ZIP code shouldn't predetermine their future. Parents and students deserve to have the ability to choose a school that fits their needs. Opportunity Scholarships do just that." 
 
For the 2020–21 school year, at least 11,259 children are set to receive Opportunity Scholarship funding. The program serves more Black students than traditional public schools do.
 
The number of low- and middle-income children receiving Opportunity Scholarships has increased 926% since 2014
 
Film Production Resumes In North Carolina PDF Print E-mail
State Government
By Administrator   
Tuesday, 15 September 2020 09:28

Five new productions have been approved for North Carolina Film and Entertainment Grants and will start production in the state by the end of October, Governor Roy Cooper announced.

Combined, these productions are projected to generate a direct in-state spend of more than $107 million while creating 8,671 job opportunities including 650 well-paying crew positions for the state’s highly skilled film professionals.

With the help of public health officials, industry trade associations and alliances have developed protocols to aid in preventing the spread of COVID-19 at filming locations. Each production has a COVID-19 safety plan that provides extra precautions to protect those working in front of and behind the camera.
“Our state’s film industry continues to welcome new projects from prominent production companies,” said Governor Roy Cooper. “The industry provides good jobs and opportunities for local businesses while showcasing on a big stage what North Carolina has to offer.”
 
“USS Christmas” is a made-for-television movie about a newspaper reporter who finds love on an aircraft carrier. The production will film in the greater Wilmington area and is eligible to receive a grant rebate up to $1.1 million.
 
Another made-for-television movie, “A Nashville Christmas Carol” will film in the greater Charlotte area. Like the Charles Dickens classic, “A Christmas Carol”, this movie tells the story of a busy film director and producer who is visited by the Ghosts of Country music past and present. The production has been approved for a grant rebate up to $1,125,000.
 
“Parkside” is a feature-length film that is a relaunch of a classic franchise with a modern twist. Filming at the EUE/Screen Gems Studios in Wilmington, this production is approved for a film and entertainment grant rebate up to $7 million.
 
“Delilah” is a new series from Warner Bros. Television for OWN about a headstrong, highly principled lawyer in Charlotte who left a demanding white-shoe law firm a decade ago and hung her own shingle so she could make raising her children her top priority. Filming in and around Charlotte, the series is eligible for a grant rebate up to $5,406,624.
 
Finally, the second season of “Hightown” will continue the story of a woman’s journey to sobriety that is overshadowed by a murder which she feels convinced she must solve. Season 2 of the STARZ series from Lionsgate Television and Jerry Bruckheimer Television, will also film in the greater Wilmington area and has been approved for a grant rebate of up to $12 million.
 
“2019 was a banner year for film and television production in North Carolina and despite some setbacks related to COVID-19, it looks like 2020 will also be a great year for the state’s industry,” added North Carolina Film Office director Guy Gaster. “It is exciting to have these productions up and running and we may have even more before the end of the year.”
 
In addition to the newest productions to be approved for funding from the North Carolina Film and Entertainment Grant, production continues on several non-grant qualifying projects including the latest seasons of the reality series “My Big, Fat, Fabulous Life” and “Love It Or List It” in the Piedmont Triad and Triangle regions respectively. Two other Piedmont Triad-based projects recently wrapped production: the SAG-signatory feature “Where’s Rose” and the new docu-series “Secrets of the Zoo: North Carolina”.
 
The North Carolina Film and Entertainment Grant provides financial assistance to attract feature film and television productions that will stimulate economic activity and create jobs in the state. Production companies receive no money up front and must meet direct in-state spending requirements to qualify for grant funds. The program is administered by the North Carolina Department of Commerce and promoted by the North Carolina Film Office, part of VisitNC and the Economic Development Partnership of North Carolina.
 
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Last Updated on Tuesday, 15 September 2020 09:32
 
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